Lumen

      Camille Flammarion

Lumen

Lumen consist of a series of dialogues between a man and a disembodied spirit which is free to roam the Universe at will. The novel includes observations about the implications of the finite velocity of light, and many images of otherworldly life adapted to Alien circumstances Considered "early science fiction", by author Camille Flammarion, one of the most interesting characters produced by the 19th century, and a definitive influence on authors such as Edgar Rice Burroughs and many others.

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    A Columbus of Space

      Garrett Putman Serviss

A Columbus of Space

Now, to be more specific. Of Stonewall's antecedents I know very little. I only know that, in a moderate way, he was wealthy, and that he had no immediate family ties. He was somewhere near thirty years of age, and held the diploma of one of our oldest universities. But he was not, in a general way, sociable, and I never knew him to attend any of the reunions of his former classmates, or to show the slightest interest in any of the events or functions of society, although its doors were open to him through some distant relatives who were widely connected in New York, and who at times tried to draw him into their circle. He would certainly have adorned it, but it had no attraction for him.

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    The Moon Metal

      Garrett Putman Serviss

The Moon Metal

When the news came of the discovery of gold at the south pole, nobody suspected that the beginning had been reached of a new era in the world’s history. The newsboys cried “Extra!” as they had done a thousand times for murders, battles, fires, and Wall Street panics, but nobody was excited. In fact, the reports at first seemed so exaggerated and improbable that hardly anybody believed a word of them. Who could have been expected to credit a despatch, forwarded by cable from New Zealand, and signed by an unknown name, which contained such a statement as this: “A seam of gold which can be cut with a knife has been found within ten miles of the south pole.” The discovery of the pole itself had been announced three years before, and several scientific parties were known to be exploring the remarkable continent that surrounds it. But while they had sent home many highly interesting reports, there had been nothing to suggest the possibility of such an amazing discovery as that which was now announced. Accordingly, most sensible people looked upon the New Zealand despatch as a hoax.

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    Edison's Conquest of Mars

      Garrett Putman Serviss

Edisons Conquest of Mars

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

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    Edison's Conquest of Mars

      Garrett Putman Serviss

Edisons Conquest of Mars

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

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    Green Nazis in Space: New Essays in Literature, Art, and Culture

      James O'Meara

Green Nazis in Space: New Essays in Literature, Art, and Culture

World War II has been over for decades, but Nazis are everywhere! From girls boarding schools in Scotland to fashion shows in Peking, from utopian desert islands to New York nightclubs, from intellectually fashionable Paris cafés to campy flats in Chelsea Square. They're even in the War Room, and—my God!—they're already in outer space! 

James J. O'Meara, the Alt-Right's most provocative writer, uses his "paranoiac-critical" lens to reveal the method of Judaic culture-distortion—such as the youthful "girl-craziness” that conservatives think of as the “good old days” but was manufactured by Hollywood to undermine traditional forms of male friendship and social organizations (and start World War II)—while demonstrating that it just can’t prevent the eternal return of the “Fascist Other” throughout our popular culture.

The essays collected here, discussing pop culture icons from Kafka and Burroughs to Houllebecq, Halston and even the Green Lantern Corps, show that the defeat of the European Revolution of 1932 did not mean the end of White culture and Aryan tradition, which continue to gleam darkly beneath the glossy politically correct surface. 

Wherever you’re coming from, you’ll find ideas here that will challenge, delight, or infuriate—usually at the same time. If you’re any kind of White Nationalist, you’ll be heartened by the endurance of White cultural memes. And you’ll probably want to get another copy to send to your favorite cuckservative or Social Justice Warrior.

“With Green Nazis in Space! James J. O’Meara reminds me once again why he is my favorite literary and cultural critic. His genius is discovering surprising connections between the most widely separated realms of culture, as well as correspondences between sublime Traditionalist wisdom and sometimes ridiculous pop cultural artifacts. My favorite essays here are ‘Welcome to the Club’ and ‘Reflections on Sartorial Fascism,’ which are his most compelling statements yet of his views about the conflict between the Aryan Männerbund and Jewish cultural subversion. Audacious, insightful, and witty, Green Nazis in Space! is a terrific book.”

—Greg Johnson, author of Truth, Justice, and a Nice White Country

“Green Nazis in Space! has the delightful immediacy and variety of the best critical journalism—I think of collections of Mary McCarthy, Gore Vidal, George Orwell. Like those three, O’Meara shakes out the truth by standing conventional interpretations on their heads. Thus, the supposed “fascism" of Muriel Spark’s Jean Brodie was in reality the murderous Totalitarian Humanism of the social justice warrior (“The Fraud of Miss Jean Brodie”). Franz Kafka was no doomed, obsessed prophet of the Holocaust, but rather a millionaire slacker whose “horror” stories were written as absurdist satires (“Kafka: Our Folk Comrade”). And like Orwell, O’Meara particularly shines when he takes on pop culture and its social effects, such as the weird permutations that adolescent social roles underwent in postwar America (“Welcome to the Club”). Green Nazis in Space! is Mr. O’Meara’s most enjoyable collection so far.”

—Margot Metroland

“James J. O’Meara is the Camille Paglia of the Alternative Right.”

—Andy Nowicki, author of Lost Violent Souls

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