JOHN BUCHAN SERIES:

Huntingtower

Huntingtower

John Buchan

Literature & Fiction / Mystery & Thrillers / Biographies & Memoirs

This modern fairy-tale is also the gripping adventure story about Dickson McCunn, a respectable, newly retired grocer who finds himself in the thick of a plot involving the kidnapping of a Russian princess held prisoner in the rambling mansion, Huntingtower. Here, Buchan introduces some of his best-loved characters and paints a remarkable picture of a man rejuvenated by joining much younger comrades in a fight against tyranny and fear.About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World\'s Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford\'s commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
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The Path of the King

The Path of the King

John Buchan

Literature & Fiction / Mystery & Thrillers / Biographies & Memoirs

The little hut among the oak trees was dim in the October twilight on the evening of St. Callixtus\' Day. It had been used by swineherds, for the earthen floor was puddled by the feet of generations of hogs, and in the corner lay piles of rotting acorns. Outside the mist had filled the forest, and the ways were muffled with fallen leaves, so that the four men who approached the place came as stealthily as shades. They reconnoitred a moment at the entrance, for it was a country of war. "Quarters for the night," said one, and put his shoulder to the door of oak-toppings hinged on strips of cowhide. But he had not taken a step inside before he hastily withdrew. "There is something there," he cried—"something that breathes. A light, Gil." One of the four lit a lantern from his flint and poked it within. It revealed the foul floor and the rotting acorns, and in the far corner, on a bed of withered boughs, something dark which might be a man. They stood still and listened. There was the sound of painful breathing, and then the gasp with which a sick man wakens. A figure disengaged itself from the shadows. Seeing it was but one man, the four pushed inside, and the last pulled the door to behind him. "What have we here?" the leader cried. A man had dragged himself to his feet, a short, square fellow who held himself erect with a grip on a side-post. His eyes were vacant, dazzled by the light and also by pain. He seemed to have had hard usage that day, for his shaggy locks were matted with blood from a sword-cut above his forehead, one arm hung limp, and his tunic was torn and gashed. He had no weapons but a knife which he held blade upwards in the hollow of his big hand. The four who confronted him were as ill-looking a quartet as Duke William\'s motley host could show. One, the leader, was an unfrocked priest of Rouen; one was a hedge-robber from the western marches who had followed Alan of Brittany; a third had the olive cheeks and the long nose of the south; and the fourth was a heavy German from beyond the Rhine. They were the kites that batten on the offal of war, and the great battle on the seashore having been won by better men, were creeping into the conquered land for the firstfruits of its plunder. "An English porker," cried the leader. "We will have the tusks off him." Indeed, in the wild light the wounded man, with his flat face and forked beard, had the look of a boar cornered by hounds. "\'Ware his teeth," said the one they called Gil. "He has a knife in his trotter." The evil faces of the four were growing merry. They were worthless soldiers, but adepts in murder. Loot was their first thought, but after that furtive slaying. There seemed nothing to rob here, but there was weak flesh to make sport of. Gil warily crept on one side, where he held his spear ready. The ex-priest, who had picked up somewhere a round English buckler, gave the orders. "I will run in on him, and take his stroke, so you be ready to close. There is nothing to be feared from the swine. See, he is blooded and faints." The lantern had been set on the ground by the door and revealed only the lower limbs of the four. Their heads were murky in shadow. Their speech was foreign to the wounded man, but he saw their purpose. He was clearly foredone with pain, but his vacant eyes kindled to slow anger, and he shook back his hair so that the bleeding broke out again on his forehead. He was as silent as an old tusker at bay. The ex-priest gave the word and the four closed in on him. He defeated their plan by hurling himself on the leader\'s shield, so that his weight bore him backwards and he could not use his weapon. The spears on the flanks failed for the same reason, and the two men posted there had well-nigh been the death of each other. The fourth, the one from the south, whose business it had been to support the priest, tripped and fell sprawling beside the lantern.
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Sir Quixote of the Moors

Sir Quixote of the Moors

John Buchan

Literature & Fiction / Mystery & Thrillers / Biographies & Memoirs

This first volume of the premium collection features 8 amazing novels by Scottish novelist, historian and Unionist politician who served as Governor General of Canada, JOHN BUCHAN. Creator of such memorable characters as Richard Hannay, Sir Edward Leithen and Dickson McCunn, this collection features the non serialized novels, in chronological order of publication. This volume has novels 1 to 8; while vol. 2 has novels 9 to 15. The eight novels are the following:Sir Quixote of the Moors  John Burnet of Barns Grey Weather A Lost Lady of Old Years The Half-Hearted A Lodge in the Wilderness Prester John Salute to Adventurers 
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Salute to Adventurers

Salute to Adventurers

John Buchan

Literature & Fiction / Mystery & Thrillers / Biographies & Memoirs

Andrew Garvald is a young Scottish merchant who has bravely come to make his fortune in a newly colonised America. Outlawed from Virginian society for opposing the London traders’ monopoly, his friends are Red Ringan, a pirate and gentleman adventurer and Shalah, an exiled Indian prince. When Garvald is faced with a deadly foe, the stakes are high - the love of a beautiful lady and the existence of Virginia. John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir, was a British novelist and Unionist politician who, between 1935 and 1940, served as the Governor General of Canada. He was born and primarily educated in Scotland, and further schooled in England, obtaining a degree in Literae Humaniores, and befriending a number of influential future writers while studying at the University of Oxford. After a brief career in law, Buchan began writing and his political and diplomatic career, serving as a private secretary to the colonial administrator of various colonies in South Africa, and eventually wrote propaganda for the British war effort following the outbreak of the First World War. Once back in civilian life, Buchan was elected the Member of Parliament for the Combined Scottish Universities, but spent most of his time on his writing career. He is the author of The Thirty-Nine Steps and other adventure fiction.
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The Gap in the Curtain

The Gap in the Curtain

John Buchan

Literature & Fiction / Mystery & Thrillers / Biographies & Memoirs

When a famous professor offers guests at a country-party the opportunity to see into their futures, several men, including two who see the news of their own deaths, must decide how to live their lives when faced with these inevitabilities.With its supernatural premise, The Gap in the Curtain is a departure from author John Buchan's usual adventure stories. The narrator, Sir Edward Leithen, features prominently in several other John Buchan novels, including The Power-House, The Dancing Floor, John Macnab, and Sick Heart River.HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.
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The Three Hostages

The Three Hostages

John Buchan

Literature & Fiction / Mystery & Thrillers / Biographies & Memoirs

This early (1924) spy adventure is one of five Buchan novels featuring the heroic Richard Hannay. Hannay is called out of retirement to rescue the kidnapped offspring of three highly placed British citizens. Hannay soon uncovers a global syndicate supporting a single man who has notions of world domination. The story suffers from exaggerated descriptions of its characters. For instance, the kidnapper, Medina, is not just a good shot, he's the best shot in England next to the King. The British are portrayed as wonderful people, but other races fare less well. Yet the story is undoubtedly good fun and is enhanced by the modulated voice and subtle characterizations of British actor Edmund Dehn. For large suspense collections.
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John MacNab

John MacNab

John Buchan

Literature & Fiction / Mystery & Thrillers / Biographies & Memoirs

‘Buchan knew that you can’t buck the consequences of your actions, and that your life is what you make of it. Perhaps his peculiarly Scottish combination of Romanticism and Calvinism – daring living and high thinking – is due to return to fashion.’ – The Independent Magazine In 1925, John Buchan published his second most famous novel, "John MacNab"; three high-flying men - a barrister, a cabinet minister and a banker - are suffering from boredom. They concoct a plan to cure it. They inform three Scottish estates that they will poach from each two stags and a salmon in a given time. They sign collectively as 'John McNab' and await the responses. This novel is a light interlude within the "Leithen Stories" series - an evocative look at the hunting, shooting and fishing lifestyle in Highland Scotland. Introduction by Andrew Greig.
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