Hard Way Out of Hell

      Johnny D. Boggs

Hard Way Out of Hell

In 1913, on the fiftieth anniversary of the Lawrence, Kansas Massacre, former bushwhacker Cole Younger stands before a preacher at a tent revival. "I was, I remain, and I will always be a wicked man," Younger states, taking a step toward salvation. And for a man like Cole Younger, there is much to confess.

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    Hard Winter

      Johnny D. Boggs

Hard Winter

Weather and creaking joints permitting, Jim Hawkins could be found every weekend sitting in that rocker right outside the Manix Store in Augusta, whittling and spitting. But Jim Hawkins didn't say much. Few knew what age Jim Hawkins might own up to, but Big Clem Ellis said he'd heard that Jim Hawkins was fifty years old, which might explain why his hair was so gray, or why he needed a scarred hickory cane to push himself out of that rocking chair, especially when it got cold, and it got bitter cold in Augusta. Especially the past winter.
Folks figured the Chinooks would never get there, and the warm winds didn't arrive in time for many farmers. Come spring, homesteaders by the score gave up, saying good-bye to their mortgages, the unforgiving wind, and forlorn dreams. Still, Jim Hawkins said hardly anything. Ever. That's how Henry Lancaster felt.
That all changed when Jim Hawkins took Henry along on a scouting trip. The man who so rarely talked told his grandson how it...

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    Whiskey Kills

      Johnny D. Boggs

Whiskey Kills

His Arrows Fly Straight into the Hearts of His Enemies was the Comanche name given him by his father. But the Pale Eyes gave him a new name, Daniel Killstraight, and that was the name by which he was known after his return to the reservation of the Kowas, Comanches, and Apaches. He became a native police officer, called a Metal Shirt by the Indians.
When Toyarocho, drunk on contraband whiskey, rolls over onto the body of his four-year-old daughter, smothering her to death, Leviticus Ellenbogen, the new Indian agent, is appalled and wants Killstraight to find out who supplied Toyarocho with the whiskey. If it was a white man, Killstraight cannot make an arrest, but he can collect evidence. There is one clue. The whiskey Toyarocho had drunk was in a ginger beer bottle manufactured by Cox and Coursey Bottling Works of Dallas, Texas.
In the course of his investigation, Killstraight finds additional instances of whiskey running among the Indians, all of it in the same kind of...

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    Wreaths of Glory

      Johnny D. Boggs

Wreaths of Glory

William Clarke Quantrill was a hated name during the War between the States by the Federals of the Union Army as well as by many non-combatants. Even the high command of the Confederacy distrusted him. But there were others who were passionate sympathizers. He was both friend and mentor‚ but also manipulator and opportunist.

Alistair Durant was someone who came to know him in all these guises. Durant was a young Confederate soldier‚ captured by the Yankees‚ and released when he took an oath never again to bear arms against the Union. He had a long walk back to his home in Clay County, Missouri. It is on this trek that Alistair meets another youngster‚ Beans Kimbrough.

The two become companions and then friends on the way to Clay County, and it is there that Beans will introduce Alistair to a man calling himself Charley Hart. Hart has a fantastic plan—to organize a militia to fight against the Federals.

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    Doubtful Canon

      Johnny D. Boggs

Doubtful Canon

For twenty years, a half-crazed albino has been scheming to recover $30,000 in gold coin buried in Doubtful Canon. But a number of setbacks have kept Whitey Grey from claiming the prize—Apache, Mexican bandits, rustlers, thieves, bushwhackers and the like. Even if he did manage to get through the treacherous territory, the gold is stashed in a hole so narrow only a child could get through. Then Whitey meets three enterprising twelve-year-olds craving adventure, and a plan begins to take shape…

Notorious gunfighters Curly Bill Brocious and Johnny Ringo have other ideas for that gold. So does Eleora Giddings, a young woman seeking her father’s grave. Add to that a band of Apaches fleeing the San Carlos reservation, and there will be plenty adventure for all in a mad race for the money.

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    West Texas Kill

      Johnny D. Boggs

West Texas Kill

An American original, the great Johnny D. Boggs weaves a Texas-sized tale of an 1880s badlands—under the grasp of a lawman gone rogue. . .

In For Justice

In For The Kill

Between the Pecos River and Rio Grande a vast, harsh land was ruled by Texas Rangers Captain Hector Savage. Savage's motive wasn't duty, it was money; he's turned this desolate place into a bloodied, terrorized kingdom. Now, a protégé of Savage, Sergeant Dave Chance, has come with a prisoner—a big-talking murderer in his own right—shackled at his side. A decent, honest Ranger, Chance cannot stand idly by while Savage runs roughshod over the territory. Now, to save a traumatized people, he must turn his prisoner loose and give him a gun. Only their combined firepower can penetrate Savage's fortress and kill him.

That is, if they don't kill each other first. . .

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    Greasy Grass

      Johnny D. Boggs

Greasy Grass

Johnny D. Boggs turns the battlefield itself into a character in this historical retelling of Custer's Last Stand, when George Custer led most of his command to annihilation at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in southern Montana in 1876. More than forty first-person narratives are used—Indian and white, military and civilian, men and women—to paint a panorama of the battle itself. Boggs brings the events and personalities of the Battle of the Little Bighorn to life in a series of first-hand accounts.

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    Río Chama

      Johnny D. Boggs

Río Chama

After a priest is lynched, gunfighter Britton Wade is the only one left who can guarantee justice!
In Santa Fe, Jeremiah Cole has been convicted and sentenced to hang for the lynching of a priest. Still, most people believe Cole will never be executed. He is the son of Senator Roman Cole, a man with both the wealth and political power to stop the hanging. The odds are so good that Jeremiah Cole will escape execution at Chama, where he must be taken to be hung, that a reward is offered to anyone who will successfully transport the prisoner.
Britton Wade, a gunfighter and gambler, accepts the challenge. Wade's reputation as a gunfighter might stop most people dead in their tracks, but that's not likely to deter Senator Cole's riders. To further complicate his mission, Britton Wade is in dire health, and doesn't know just how much longer he has to live.
The greatest mystery of all is that Wade doesn't seem the least interested in the money. Why has Wade accepted...

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    Kill the Indian

      Johnny D. Boggs

Kill the Indian

“Boggs is among the best Western writers at work today. He writes with depth, flavor, and color." —Booklist
Young Comanches Daniel Killstraight and Charles Flint have been called to Texas. Captain Pratt will be giving a talk on the transformations brought about by the Carlisle Industrial School, of which Killstraight and Flint are shining examples. They'll be joining a Comanche delegation led by Quanah Parker, who will be negotiating grasslands leases—until blown-out gas lamps in Quanah Parker's room kill a Comanche chief and put Parker in a coma.
But the question of who tried to murder Quanah Parker is not an easy one. He had many enemies among both native and white men. Daniel attempts to unravel the mystery while fulfilling his original purpose in Texas—to support Captain Pratt's talk. But he doesn't know who to trust, especially as the list of suspects begins to dwindle.
Will Killstraight figure out who is after Quanah Parker?...

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    The Raven's Honor

      Johnny D. Boggs

The Raven's Honor

Sam Houston is a living legend in 1861. The hero of the Battle of San Jacinto, he had defeated Santa Anna to win independence for Texas back in 1836. He had twice served as president of the Republic of Texas, helped Texas join the Union, and served as senator and governor of Texas. Before settling in Texas, he had been a hero of the Creek War and governor of Tennessee. He had been friends with Andrew Jackson and Davy Crockett, and had been adopted into the Cherokee tribe, whose rights he had often defended and who had named him the Raven. Yet now, approaching seventy years of hard living, he finds everything he has fought for being torn asunder. Texas is joining the Confederacy, and Houston, a Unionist who has been cast out as governor, quickly loses power, prestige, and friends. He could hide in retirement, but such is not the way of a warrior. The Raven prepares for his most important fight yet. He knows this battle will test his endurance and faith. He knows he will need his...

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    Mojave

      Johnny D. Boggs

Mojave

"Boggs is among the best western writers at work today." —Booklist

"Boggs is unparalleled in evoking the gritty reality of the Old West." —The Shootist

'Til Death Do Us Part

Stranded in the Mojave Desert, Micah Bishop is about to cash in his chips for good when he's rescued by an unlikely savior. Whip Watson is hand-delivering two dozen brides to the silver boom town of Calico, where miners are going loco for companionship. Better still, Watson asks Micah if he'd help escort the wagons—and far be it for Micah to pass up both cash and some very pretty faces.

But Micah doesn't know that Whip Watson has some killer competition. Candy Crutchfield is racing to get to Calico first with her own maids-in-waiting. Neither Watson or Crutchfield are going to back down. Both are willing to kill to beat the competition.

Now, Micah is going to find out just how far he'll go for a buck. Because these "wives" aren't what they seem. And they're...

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    Northfield

      Johnny D. Boggs

Northfield

SUMMARY: On September 7, 1876, the James-Younger gang attempted to rob the First National Bank of Northfield, Minnesota, with disastrous consequences. In a unique, compelling approach, author Johnny D. Boggs shifts perspectives from one first-person account to another to describe the bloody robbery, as well as the events leading to it and its aftermath.
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