The Princess Bride

The Princess Bride

William Goldman

Literature & Fiction / Biographies & Memoirs / Screenplays & Plays

What happens when the most beautiful girl in the world marries the handsomest prince of all time and he turns out to be...well...a lot less than the man of her dreams? As a boy, William Goldman claims, he loved to hear his father read the S. Morgenstern classic, *The Princess Bride*. But as a grown-up he discovered that the boring parts were left out of good old Dad's recitation, and only the "good parts" reached his ears. Now Goldman does Dad one better. He's reconstructed the "Good Parts Version" to delight wise kids and wide-eyed grownups everywhere. What's it about? Fencing. Fighting. True Love. Strong Hate. Harsh Revenge. A Few Giants. Lots of Bad Men. Lots of Good Men. Five or Six Beautiful Women. Beasties Monstrous and Gentle. Some Swell Escapes and Captures. Death, Lies, Truth, Miracles, and a Little Sex. In short, it's about everything.
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The Novels of William Goldman: Boys and Girls Together, Marathon Man, and the Temple of Gold

The Novels of William Goldman: Boys and Girls Together, Marathon Man, and the Temple of Gold

William Goldman

Literature & Fiction / Biographies & Memoirs / Screenplays & Plays

Three novels from a multiple Academy Award winner and the New York Times–bestselling author of The Princess Bride. In Boys and Girls Together, author William Goldman offers a beautiful tale of early adulthood inspired by his own experiences. Five friends—all young, creative, ambitious, and troubled—make their way to New York City to pursue their dreams. Together they struggle, fight, love, make art, and face the hard truths of life. In Marathon Man—the New York Times–bestselling thriller Goldman adapted into the classic film starring Dustin Hoffman and Sir Laurence Olivier—Columbia University student and aspiring marathon runner Thomas “Babe” Levy is trying to clear his late father’s name after accusations of Communist affiliation. But soon Thomas finds himself embroiled in a Nazi conspiracy—and running for his life. In Goldman’s debut novel, The Temple of Gold, Raymond Euripides Trevitt comes of age in midwestern, mid-twentieth-century America. He is virtually alone in Athens, Illinois, until a boy named Zock moves in next door. Through adolescence, double dating, and first loves, they grow up side-by-side. But as their paths diverge, a tragic accident leaves Ray alone once again, and he must learn to find hope in the depths of despair.
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Adventures in the Screen Trade

Adventures in the Screen Trade

William Goldman

Literature & Fiction / Biographies & Memoirs / Screenplays & Plays

** *Now available as an ebook for the first time!* ** No one knows the writer's Hollywood more intimately than William Goldman. Two-time Academy Award-winning screenwriter and the bestselling author of *Marathon Man*, *Tinsel*, *Boys and Girls Together*, and other novels, Goldman now takes you into Hollywood's inner sanctums...on and behind the scenes for *Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid*, *All the President's Men*, and other films...into the plush offices of Hollywood producers...into the working lives of acting greats such as Redford, Olivier, Newman, and Hoffman...and into his own professional experiences and creative thought processes in the crafting of screenplays. You get a firsthand look at why and how films get made and what elements make a good screenplay. Says columnist Liz Smith, "You'll be fascinated.
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Marathon Man

Marathon Man

William Goldman

Literature & Fiction / Biographies & Memoirs / Screenplays & Plays

William Goldman's remarkable career spans more than five decades, and his credentials run the gamut from bestselling novelist to Oscar-winning screenwriter to Hollywood raconteur. He's beloved by millions of readers as the author of the classic comic-romantic fantasy The Princess Bride. And he's notorious for creating the most harrowing visit to the dentist in literary and cinematic history--in one of the seminal thrillers of the twentieth century. . . . MARATHON MAN Tom "Babe" Levy is a runner in every sense: racing tirelessly toward his goals of athletic and academic excellence--and endlessly away from the specter of his famous father's scandal-driven suicide. But an unexpected visit from his beloved older brother will set in motion a chain of events that plunge Babe into a vortex of terror, treachery, and murder--and force him into a race for his life . . . and for the answer to the fateful question, "Is it safe?"
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Which Lie Did I Tell?: More Adventures in the Screen Trade

Which Lie Did I Tell?: More Adventures in the Screen Trade

William Goldman

Literature & Fiction / Biographies & Memoirs / Screenplays & Plays

From the Oscar-winning screenwriter of **Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid **and **The Princess Bride** (he also wrote the novel), and the bestselling author of **Adventures in the Screen Trade** comes a garrulous new book that is as much a screenwriting how-to (and how-not-to) manual as it is a feast of insider information. If you want to know why a no-name like Kathy Bates was cast in **Misery**-it's in here. Or why Linda Hunt's brilliant work in **Maverick** didn't make the final cut-William Goldman gives you the straight truth. Why Clint Eastwood loves working with Gene Hackman and how MTV has changed movies for the worse-William Goldman, one of the most successful screenwriters in Hollywood today, tells all he knows. Devastatingly eye-opening and endlessly entertaining, **Which Lie Did I Tell?** is indispensable reading for anyone even slightly intrigued by the process of how a movie gets made.
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The Temple of Gold

The Temple of Gold

William Goldman

Literature & Fiction / Biographies & Memoirs / Screenplays & Plays

William Goldman’s stunning debut novel about a young boy, adrift and alone, coming of age in a cruel world Raymond Euripides Trevitt is not yet ten when he resolves to make his own way in life. When a new boy, Zock, moves in next door, he knows he has finally met his partner in life’s great adventures. As they come of age in midwestern, midcentury America, Ray and Zock become the best of friends—even though they’re opposites in many ways. Ray takes Zock hiking; Zock teaches Ray about poetry. Together, they run away to Chicago, hide out in movie theaters, and watch Gunga Din over and over. They navigate high school together: double dating, learning about first love, getting into college. But during a summer visit home, a tragic accident leaves Ray racked with guilt and self-loathing. Broken and lost, Ray is left to find his way through life one blunder at a time, never giving up hope or relinquishing his quest for atonement. This ebook features a biography of William Goldman.
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Boys and Girls Together: A Novel

Boys and Girls Together: A Novel

William Goldman

Literature & Fiction / Biographies & Memoirs / Screenplays & Plays

In New York, five young people sacrifice everything for a life in the theater Aaron, Walt, Rudy, Jenny, and Branch—a writer, a director, two actors, and one iron-willed producer. They grew up as creative, ambitious loners, and they all believe that their destiny lies in New York City. For these five, art is a calling to which they will sacrifice everything they have. They are determined to realize their potential even if it means destroying their friends—or themselves. More than a coming-of-age story or a portrait of Manhattan’s theater scene in the 1960s, Boys and Girls Together is a white-hot novel of the pains and joys of youthful creativity. A sensation when first published, William Goldman’s dramatic tale remains a masterwork. The sixties may be over, but the agonies of youth will never change. This ebook features a biography of William Goldman.
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The Novels of William Goldman

The Novels of William Goldman

William Goldman

Literature & Fiction / Biographies & Memoirs / Screenplays & Plays

Three novels from a multiple Academy Award winner and the New York Times–bestselling author of The Princess Bride. In Boys and Girls Together, author William Goldman offers a beautiful tale of early adulthood inspired by his own experiences. Five friends—all young, creative, ambitious, and troubled—make their way to New York City to pursue their dreams. Together they struggle, fight, love, make art, and face the hard truths of life. In Marathon Man—the New York Times–bestselling thriller Goldman adapted into the classic film starring Dustin Hoffman and Sir Laurence Olivier—Columbia University student and aspiring marathon runner Thomas "Babe" Levy is trying to clear his late father's name after accusations of Communist affiliation. But soon Thomas finds himself embroiled in a Nazi conspiracy—and running for his life. In Goldman's debut novel, The Temple of...
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Which Lie Did I Tell?

Which Lie Did I Tell?

William Goldman

Literature & Fiction / Biographies & Memoirs / Screenplays & Plays

RetailFrom the Oscar-winning screenwriter of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Princess Bride (he also wrote the novel), and the bestselling author of Adventures in the Screen Trade comes a garrulous new book that is as much a screenwriting how-to (and how-not-to) manual as it is a feast of insider information. If you want to know why a no-name like Kathy Bates was cast in Misery-it's in here. Or why Linda Hunt's brilliant work in Maverick didn't make the final cut-William Goldman gives you the straight truth. Why Clint Eastwood loves working with Gene Hackman and how MTV has changed movies for the worse-William Goldman, one of the most successful screenwriters in Hollywood today, tells all he knows. Devastatingly eye-opening and endlessly entertaining, Which Lie Did I Tell? is indispensable reading for anyone even slightly intrigued by the process of how a movie gets made. From the Trade Paperback edition.Amazon.com ReviewSomething odd, if predictable, became of screenwriter William Goldman after he wrote the touchstone tell-all book on filmmaking, Adventures in the Screen Trade (1983), he became a Hollywood leper. Goldman opens his long-awaited sequel by writing about his years of exile before he found himself--again--as a valuable writer in Hollywood. Fans of the two-time Oscar-winning writer (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, All the President's Men) have anxiously waited for this follow-up since his career serpentined into a variety of big hits and critical bombs in the '80s and '90s. Here Goldman scoops on The Princess Bride (his own favorite), Misery, Maverick, Absolute Power, and others. Goldman's conversational style makes him easy to read for the film novice but meaty enough for the detail-oriented pro. His tendency to ramble into other subjects may be maddening (he suddenly switches from being on set with Eastwood to anecdotes about Newman and Garbo), but we can excuse him because of one fact alone: he is so darn entertaining. Like most sequels, Which Lie follows the structure of the original. Both Goldman books have three parts: stories about his movies, a deconstruction of Hollywood (here the focus is on great movie scenes), and a workshop for screenwriters. (The paperback version of the first book also comes with his full-length screenplay of Butch; his collected works are also worth checking out). This final segment is another gift--a toolbox--for the aspiring screenwriter. Goldman takes newspaper clippings and other ideas and asks the reader to diagnose their cinematic possibilities. Goldman also gives us a new screenplay he's written (The Big A), which is analyzed--with brutal honesty--by other top writers. With its juicy facts and valuable sidebars on what makes good screenwriting, this is another entertaining must-read from the man who coined what has to be the most-quoted adage about movie-business success: "Nobody knows anything." --Doug ThomasFrom Publishers WeeklyTwo-time Oscar-winning screenwriter Goldman follows up his irreverent, gossipy and indispensable screenwriting bible, Adventures in the Screen Trade (1983), with this equally wise, tart and very funny account of the filmmaking process. He begins with the surprising admission that he was a "leper" in Hollywood between 1980 and 1985: after Magic (1978), he was unable to get any screenplays produced until The Princess Bride (1987). (Moviegoers' loss was readers' gain: during those years he wrote six novels.) Wildly opinionated ("Vertigo--for me, the most overrated movie of all time") but astute, Goldman is a 35-year industry veteran with lots of tales and a knack for spinning them. He knows how to captivate his audience, peppering his philosophical advice with star-studded anecdotes. Whether he's detailing why virtually every leading actor turned down the lead in Misery before James Caan offered to be drug-tested to get the part, or how Michael Douglas was the perfect producer but the wrong actor for The Ghost and the Darkness, Goldman offers keen observations in a chatty style. In the last section of the book, he gamely offers readers a rough first draft of an original screenplay. Even more bravely, he includes instructive, intuitive and sometimes scathing critiques by fellow screenwriters, including Peter and Bobby Farrelly (There's Something About Mary), Callie Khouri (Thelma & Louise) and John Patrick Shanley (Moonstruck). Movie buffs of all stripes, even those with no interest in writing for the screen, will enjoy this sublimely entertaining adventure. (Mar.) Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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